The Curse: A Book Review (And Welcoming 2019)

Hello Everyone. I know it has been a very long time since I posted. It seems like life and I are wrestling to have control on the schedule, and life keeps on winning. But the good news is that I am reading and writing again. That’s a big deal for me because the past one year felt like that words have turned into strangers. They won’t entice me in reading, and they won’t entice me in writing. I cannot explain the joy finding the words again.

So let us start 2019 in February with a book review  with a hope that I will be able to win future battles as well with life.

The Curse: A Dystopian Thriller

By Randeep Wadehra

Amazon

Goodreads

Available for Free on Kindle Unlimited

Blurb

Through peace, it’s justice we seek!
The hunter will meet the fate of the hunted
And the mighty will serve the meek!

Twenty years ago, a corrupt President, a greedy industrialist, and a sycophant policeman uprooted the tribal people from their own land and burned their houses. Twenty years later, the Republic of Bodh is in danger from a similar evil troika.

The curse uttered by a frail tribal woman during the carnage twenty years ago has inspired Jwaala, the only female leader in the senate, to reform the Republic of Bodh.

But the same curse has turned Saaya, once an innocent victim of the massacre, into a relentless killing machine with a mission to prey on the predators.
Even when the Republic spirals into a storm of scandals, the greedy and corrupt President Chaupat is torn between his lust for a dancer and his unrequited passion for his wife Kaamini.

Will Saaya succeed in his mission or will Chaupat thwart his efforts?
Will Jwaala, orphaned in a violent attack, be able to turn the curse for the greedy into a blessing for the poor? Will she succeed to save the Republic from another ensuing bloodshed?

The Curse is a gritty political thriller about people who have lost much to greed but want to transform their nation. 

Initially, I had no interest in this book, but when my friends started telling how this book was written so well, my interest was piqued. I picked this book only to see what was so good about it. I did not expect it to be an excellent read, however, the book proved me wrong. It even appealed to apolitical person like me.

This is the story of a dystopian world which is being ruled by Chaupat. The poor are getting poorer and the rich are getting richer. There are pockets of slums which government refused to recognize. The people living in these slums are considered dispensable. In such corrupt and oppressive society, there emerged our hero or heroes who want to change the system—some from inside and some by violence. It is an interesting book which you will want to read ahead to know about.

What I liked

  • Story in itself: Although it is not a very unpredictable story, it still manages to capture the interest of the readers by its details, language and writing style. There is a little suspense to the story, but I was able to guess that early on. Part of it was unanticipated, but it was such a hurried execution that I thought it more of a passing end than the big reveal itself.
  • Idea: The book is very relevant to current times. It talks about the things that are happening around me, the fears that I am truly afraid of at this time, and because of this, I could relate to it more.
  • Politically Impartial: The book actually considers as evil both the main party and opposition and hence stays clear of political partiality. Although some would say that there is a certain kind of partiality in declaring all parties as wrong as well, the book still felt impartial in its intake.

What I did not Like

  • Predictability: I have no idea how the author could have avoided the predictability, but I wish there was less of predictability in the story. I wanted to be taken up by surprise by the end. However, the only surprise sequence of the story was too short to garner any attention.
  • Names of the Characters: I think what adds to the above point is the names of the characters. For non-hindi speakers, this might not be an issue. But for hindi speakers, the names added to the predictability. Each name is the directly chosen to express what the characters role in the story is going to be. I understand finding such right names is difficult and must have been a difficult job for the author. But, I would have liked something subtler in these names—not this outright definition of how all the characters are going to be. This added to the predictability for me. Even though it felt like careful and deliberate selection by author, I could not enjoy that.
  • Ending: I have said this earlier as well, but the end sequence of the story—the one that was supposed to be the surprise—was not very well-executed. I wished it wasn’t the miss and blink kind of thing. I would have enjoyed the book more if that ending had appealed to me.

Overall Thoughts

Overall, the book is an interesting read. Those who want to read something about the political situation in the country (I do think this is applicable to many countries) will enjoy the story. It is written well and flows smoothly. The book is a short-read. For the people who have Indian KU subscription, the book is available free of cost.  

Overall Ratings

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