H=Hogwarts from Harry Potter Series

Hogwarts does not need any introduction. If you have ever read Harry Potter or maybe even watched any of the movie, you would remember Hogwarts. So, this is going to be a short post.

When I first read about Hogwarts, the best thing for me about the school was the sense of discovery. There are so many rooms, so much of magic in those halls that even teachers and guardians did not know what could be uncovered. The Great Hall, the different houses and their common rooms, the moving staircases, the flying ghosts, the paintings which could talk– I could go on and on and on.

Hogwarts is a school, but not in the traditional sense. It allows you to learn and grow and most importantly, explore. There are places like Chamber of Secrets which were untouched. The exploration was so much the part of the school that there was a whole Marauder Map which could track people.

Lastly, I would like to mention Hogwarts library where so many books were available. Every time, I read about Hogwarts, I wondered if there is a letter which is going to come for me too, even during this late age.

Hogwarts is a dream-school, despite being dangerous, it is a place which I would love to explore if given a chance.

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G= Guernsey of “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society”

I am running very late today. I missed yesterday and want to make up for that as well as today. So this is going to be a short post.

For G, I want to cover Guernsey from Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society. There are a lot of things which are good in that book, but I think the place itself deserves a mention. This is not only the story of a town, but whole place recovering from occupation as explained in the introduction to Guernsey in the beginning of the book.

Ships are coming to St. Peter Port everyday to bring us things Guernsey still needs: food, clothes, seeds, ploughs, animal feeds, tools, medicines—and most important, now that we have food to eat, the shoes.

This above paragraph explains so much about the impact of the war on the society which is further elaborated by the thirst for the news in local populace. And this was the state of a place, as book explains, where it was meant to be proven that “German occupation was a modern one.” Another of the passage explains how the parents had no news of their children, whom they sent to a safe place, for six months. German Occupation is further explained in the letters in the book:

“They kept track of every gallon we milked, weighed the cream, recorded every sack of flour. They left the chickens alone for a while. But when feed and scraps become so scarce, they ordered us to kill off the older chickens, so the good layers could have enough feed to keep on laying eggs.”

Further wartime is explained when there wasn’t any salt in the town and the people had to carry seawater to salt the food. I cannot even imagine the food without salt for one or two days (I have tried, and I get serious headaches). Imagine the suffering of these people.

There is a mention of the war everywhere in the book, but beauty of Guernsey is also highlighted in the story as it is in the following passage:

My greatest pleasure has been in resuming my walks along the clifftop. The channel is no longer framed in rolls of barbed wire, the view is unbroken by large VERBOTEN signs. The mines are gone from our beaches and I can walk when, where, and for as long as I like.

But I think what touched me the most was the way the war was described for this island. This is the island which had seen death—so much so that there wasn’t even place to burn the bodies. And yet the people of this island hoped: hoped that the vines will cover the bunker walls, hoped that the world will be a better and beautiful place, hoped to live their life normally. Among all the bookish places I have read and talked about, this is one place which is very close to my heart and one which makes me feel happy and safe.

P.S. : I have seen the movie and liked it as well. But the Guernsey which stayed with me is the Guernsey of the book, although the movie has some exceptional cinematography.