B=Benaras of Book “Where Even the Present is Ancient: Benaras”

“B” was one of the difficult choices in this list. I am living in Mumbai, and I wanted to cover Bombay. But more I thought, more I realized that the most of the Bombay that I read in the novels either was set in Bandra or in slums of Dharavi—none of the places I associate myself with.

But then, I realized I don’t want to write about Bombay. “B” reminds me of something else, someplace else—a place where I have never been, but yet I dream to go to. This is one of the few places in India which I want to explore. “B” reminds me Benaras and brings to me chimes of worship near Ganga river. Benaras is now named as Varanasi, but the book I am talking of calls it Benaras– Where even the Present is Ancient: Benaras. I do not think a lot of people know of this book, but I got a chance to read and review the book as a part of The Book Club. I did a review for the book in 2014, almost 5 years ago. But the lines of the poems in the book are still afresh in my mind.

The book starts its first poem by explaining what Benaras is:

Sometimes Benaras seems like a poem,

A long lost one, at that.

I know Benaras for Ganga, for a river that is known to wash away the sins of humankind. Even though I do not believe in such words, yet, sometimes, I wonder how much the river bears. Many times, I recall the lines from a poem in this book called “Meeting Ganga”

I meet Ganga today.

Still, amazing,

complex and terrifying,

melancholic, even sad at times–

her feelings hidden away in gentle laps

I thought.

For those who have sat near Ganga hearing the chants of “Har Har Gange” might get the above lines better. Benaras also means Gods and religion and that’s she describes as:

In Benaras, you open a gate, a God pops out.

Then the poem explores Manikarnika ghat and Assi ghat where the dead bodies are cremated/burnt. The book does not miss the evening prayer ritual of Benaras, the Maha arati on the Dashwamedha Ghat. She explains the whole ritual so simply in following lines:

Tourists shrieked, conch shells sounded

humanity applauded.

I lit a small lamp and let it flow

Into the unknown corridors of faith

I have seen so much of Benaras in these lines that it stayed with me even after 5 years. This is a book which put Benaras on my bucket list. And I haven’t been there yet because I do not just want to go there for one or two days. I want to meet the city like the author did, seeing all ghats, spending time with Ganga, watching Sadhus, finding that God hidden in every door, trysting with Benaras at different times to know it inside out.  I am not sure I will be able to do all these things, and hence, Benaras still remains on the bucket-list of mine, this Benaras where even the present is ancient.

It is sad that the book is not very famous. It deserves to be known. It deserves to be talked about. 78 pages and each page packs a punch!

Advertisements

Dancing with Demons: A Book Club Review

Changing the house is such a pain. If you forget to change one of your delivery address, your book will go to your past house, which is now someone else’s home, and then you have to retrace your steps to find that one book. That’s what I had to do to reach this book. After 10 days of dithering and follow-up of the courier office I finally got the book to read.

I would not have selected this book, but then I saw the cover which said “Soon to be made into Bollywood movie”. And I was hooked. I mean I don’t want to watch the movie first and then read the book. That’s the most boring thing to do in the world.

My decision was right or wrong I can’t say as in all honesty, the book was okay types. Not too good, not too bad. Like that mild coffee that could wake you up, but then that’s its only purpose. The book is okay. I have heard many people telling me that they were riveted by the book; I wasn’t, but then I wasn’t bored either.

 

DANCING WITH DEMONS
by
Nidhie Sharma
 
 
 
Blurb
 
Karan Pratap Singh is on the brink of winning the Amateur Boxing Championship, when in a moment, he loses it all. His fall from glory seems fuelled by ruthless arrogance and an out-of-control anger management problem. That, however is just symptomatic of a deeper issue. Buried under layers of his fractured subconscious lies a childhood secret he cannot come to terms with.
 
Sonia Kapoor is a beautiful, volatile young woman with a secret that torments her at night but a secret that she feels no guilt for.
 
When fate throws Karan and Sonia together in Mumbai, their personal demons and pasts collide and stir up trouble in their fragile and uncertain present. But, is redemption possible without forgiveness?
 
Dancing with Demons is a fast-paced action drama of love, loss and resurrection.
 
Grab your copy @
 
What I liked

1) Boxing Background: There are many books which explore sports, but this was my first book which explored boxing as the sport. I am not a boxing person, but then the book took me to those rings and made me see the passion of boxing from the authors’ eyes. I guess this was the best thing for me in the book.

2) Fast Pace: The book is quite fast-paced. It zooms on without giving you time to get bored. That was another good point about the book. I felt I was on a mild adventure ride.

What I didn’t like

1) Universal StoryTelling Style: I sometimes feel I just should give up. This style is not going to appeal me, at least not in Indian authors. The book started off beautifully without any head-jumps, and then by third chapter it became jumble of head-jumps. I was left wondering why the author decided Universal POV style.

2) Lack of Chemistry: The book lacks chemistry. Everything happens or is read in the eyes. The two protagonist do not talk to each other much in the book, yet they end up falling in love with each. Not only that, they wait for each other too when one is going through difficult times.  If I ever encountered a person whose past I don’t know, I would probably like to talk first. The chemistry, if there, is not developed in the book.

3) Meh Suspense: I cannot reveal it as that will spoil the book for you, but the suspense of the story did not really grip me. The author maintained the suspense about the story for a long time, which in my opinion, was not really needed. The suspense did not add anything to the story except for some pretty words and sentences. (I guess that was the purpose.)
Overall Opinion

As I said, the book was okay for me. I won’t read it again, that’s sure, but while reading, it transported me to the boxing world. Probably it wasn’t my cup of tea because all my friends have LOVED the book (Yes, loved in capitals). Sometime it happens, right? You cannot feel what others are feeling for the book.

For me, book was a pleasurable one time read. It could have been so much more (there’s a lot of potential there), but it isn’t. For now, it is the story of the boxer who is trying to redeem himself.

Three Stars
 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
 
The Book Club introduces Nidhie Sharma and asked a few questions, the details of which can be found on the link. I liked that she is a filmmaker and a novelist and she is able to juggle between the two arts of storytelling. She described her book as the following:
‘Dancing with Demons’ is a gripping romance drama set against the backdrop of combat sports in India. It is the story of two fallen souls who must vanquish their inner demons to become the people they were destined to be. When the story begins, Karan Pratap Singh, an  angst-ridden boxer and the mysterious and volatile Sonia Kapoor are angry and emotionally damaged by their pasts and when fate throws them together in Mumbai, their personal demons and pasts collide and stir trouble in their fragile and uncertain present. “It was some night. Thunder and lightning playing, chasing one another like two furtive, carefree lovers, oblivious to the havoc they were wrecking. Sonia put her hand out of the window as the bus started to hurtle down the highway, to Mumbai. A sliver of lightning fell on the trees just ahead of them, setting a normal bush on fire. Then thunder roared again… Perhaps this was an appropriate setting for what was to follow…two tumultuous lives on a head-on collision course.”
This book explores if redemption is possible without forgiveness and also delves into the depth and unsaid connection that Karan and Sonia have with each other. In fact, Sonia’s poems in the novel throw light not only on self-love and forgiveness but also on the passionate and intense relationship that these two anti-heroes share.
“I know I’m not easy to love
On somedays there’s no God above
And maybe it’s a messed up world
Into which we have been hurled
And maybe I remind you of you
So Love yourself darling, to love me too”
Overcoming one’s limitations or demons is essential in order to fulfill one’s true potential. That is the real core of this story. The good thing is, millions of people find a way to battle and overcome their inner demons. So there is hope for everyone and ‘Dancing with Demons’ is about that hope. It’s about the light at the end of the tunnel.
This novel is a fast-paced story of love, loss and resurrection for both Karan and Sonia.  
 
 
Stalk her @

Follow us +Pinterest

Play with us to win some unusual prizes   

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

This Tour is Hosted by 

We Promote So That You Can Write 

 

Color Me Rich: A Book Club Review

Sometimes, I wonder if my blog will forget me too if I forget it for so many days? But sadly my reason this time has been very valid. I have been going through the “being-sick” phase where the disease after disease (nothing major, but a litany of minor diseases) followed me. Today was the day when I entered my own kitchen after a month. I was in shock myself when I saw the dates unchanged in my kitchen calendar. So, let me wave a tentative hello.

The good thing about being sick is that I have read A LOT. And this indeed calls for capitalization. I could not concentrate on writing(half the time wasn’t allowed to even touch the laptop after office) but reading was my solace along with the pen and paper. So, I have a lot to talk about. And I will like to start this as quickly as possible.

I will start with the review of the books pending with me. The first in the list is the book I got from Book Club– Color Me Rich. I am more than a month late in this (sigh!).

 

Color Me Rich 

by 

Mohan Deep 
Blurb 
A sensitive love story of a handsome and talented struggling painter Akash Saigal. What happens when he marries an extremely rich and beautiful artist and art investor Zenobia Taraporevala?
What grabbed my attention in the book was the author and the colourful portfolio the author has. You can read all about it in the About the Author section. But I was indeed interested in the story. Another thing which captured me was the news article on which the story was based. My father has a habit of discussing news over phone or at home (random news) and a dead body of an artist has been found. My father had told me that artists are crazy, and I should cure my artistic craziness. (I believe all fathers are like this, no?) So when I heard that the story has been compared to that case, I did want to know what the book is going to talk about.
I read the book in single sitting. It’s a thin book and a very fast paced one. I did like the book and enjoyed it.
Things I liked
  1. Mix of the languages: This should be read as warning as well. But I loved that the story had the touch of local language. More than that, I liked that author did not distract the readers by explaining the meaning of each and everything. This might have been the complaint of many readers, but I loved that author embraced the localness of the book. I am not against the descriptions, but it irritates me to no end when I have to read the meaning of the words and sentences when it can be plainly guessed from the context. I hate this in other non-Indian language usage as well.
  2. Storyline: The way the story has been written is quite gripping. I did not feel like keeping the book while reading it, and that explains the engaging nature of the story for me.
Things I did not like
  1. Character Development: The author gave a lot of attention to the context and the little details, but he forgot to develop the characters. The pacing was so fast that I could hardly associate with the character. There is a character in the story of Suma. I wanted to love her, empathize with her, but I did not feel anything for her. Same goes for the main characters of the story. I wished to spend some more time with them and to get acquainted with them in a better manner.
  2.  Chemistry: This point is associated with the past point, but I did not enjoy the chemistry between the characters. The motive is dependent upon the characters’ chemistry– their love and hatred. But I was not able to tune in with the chemistry of the characters.

Overall Opinion

Despite all the faults, the book is entertaining in nature. It is a perfect one time read with the right pacing and the right thickness. And the book does not try to imitate the Western world but is happy in its own Indian-ness.  The book gets three stars from my side.

Three Stars

Grab your Copy @
or grab this book free at #KindleUnlimited 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Mohan Deep, is an Indian author, painter and Feng Shui Master. Mohan Deep is the author of ‘The Mystery and Mystique of Madhubala’ (1996), ‘It’s My Life’ (Novel) (1997), ‘Simply Scandalous: Meena Kumari’ (1998), ‘Eurekha!’ – an unauthorized biography of Rekha. (1999), ‘Four Options’ (2000), ‘Feng Shui for the Bold & Beautiful, the Rich and Famous’ (2001) and ‘Nehru and the Tantrik Woman’ (2002). After a sabbatical of a decade, during which he touched upon the lives of people as a Feng Shui Master, he was back with The Five Foolish Virgins( 2013). Mohan Deep is arguably the only Indian author to write what is often described as controversial, unauthorized star biographies in India. Columnist-journalist and former editor of ‘Illustrated Weekly of India’, Khushwant Singh called him ‘a truly gifted gossip writer’. “The maverick writer”, like columnist-reviewer-poetess.
Tara Patel described him has also been called William Goldman of Bollywood’s stars (By Behram Contractor, the Editor of Afternoon Despatch & Courier) (Source) Kitty Kelly of India (By R K Bajaj, the Editor of ‘The Daily’). Interestingly, almost every book he has wrote/penned has invited controversies for its bold content.

Stalk him @

        

Follow us # +Pinterest

 

Check out The Book Club Tour Schedule 

This Tour is Hosted by 

We Promote So That You Can Write 

Wheat, Not White– A Book Club Review

Only Wheat Not White 
by 
Varsha Dixit 
 

It feels weird to be in a reading slump– to not be able to concentrate on reading, forget about writing. I attribute all this to change of city. I don’t know why but everything makes me feel like I am an alien here, a foreigner (I am not! I am in the same country and in a city where there are many good things happening). I spent my time moping around over the fact and listening to foreign-travel songs. And then I realized how stupid I was being.

I was not going to pick up this book. When the mail for the book came, I passed it on. But then Rubina said that she can personally guarantee that the book is well-edited and well-written. I needed something to come out of my stupid mood swings, and hence I picked up this book. Before I write the summary for the book and elaborate its beauty, let me tell you it was a perfect book to get out of the slump– not too heavy–a beautifully written romance.

The Blurb

What if the one you completely love is the one you simply can’t! Twenty-six-year-old Eila Sood moves to America to mend fences with her estranged older sister, Sheela. Eila and the rest of the family in India had cut off ties with Sheela after she married Steve Jacobs, ‘out of caste, and out of color’. Elia soon realizes that Sheela’s marriage is on the rocks. To help pay Sheela’s household bills, Eila takes a second job at an afternoon strip club. When she crosses paths with the owner, the handsome Brett Wright or ‘blue-eyed ogre’ as Elia calls him, he both infuriates and fascinates her. Brett turns out to be her reluctant and unquestionably sarcastic knight in shining armor. As Eila and Brett spend more time together their desire for each other builds. However, when Brett discovers the true reason for Eila’s refusal he storms out of her life, accusing her of being a prejudiced coward. Will Eila find the courage to break stereotypes and embrace her love? Will Brett find solace in the arms of his ex-girlfriend Cate? Will Sheela and Steve divorce? All of these questions and more are answered in Varsha Dixit’s latest and humorous and steamy love story.
The book is the story about Eila who has traveled to US in order to act as a peacemaker between her parents and her sister .  Her sister, Sheela, married a white man which had severed her ties to the family. Eila has come to US in order to help Sheila reconcile with her parents. But all is not well in US. Sheela’s married life is not the same, and Eila ends up (working in a strip club) falling in love with an American. The story is how both Sheela and Eila comes to term with the fact that the color does not decide the person, but the nature does.

Although the book is mentioned as a steamy romance, it is just a love story. I did not find much “steam” into it, so don’t be afraid of diving into the book because of that.

What I liked:

A perfect blend of American-ness and Indian-ness:  I think this is the biggest weakness of the Indian novel. The novels either end up losing the Indian values and beauty while writing in English, or everything is so much explained that a reader gets bored reading about all the things they know. This novel did nothing of the sorts.  The story had perfect balance between the two cultures. She neither ignored the American culture, nor did the author explained or justified the Indian culture. That probably was the biggest USP for me.

Romance: The story kept true to the nature of the characters and has a romance which made me “feel” the love being developed along with the feeling the connection in first sight. It is not a racy novel, but then there still that aroma of romance and “touchy” feels to make one realize that we are reading about a different culture.

What I did not like

Some Plot Points: There is a point which indicates that the company that hired Eila is reducing the number of hours, and I was left wondering what kind of company hires a person and reduces their hours instantly. Probably that is how recession was in US, because my industry never saw such drastic effect in a day. In our case, it was the slow buildup of the recession things, and there were no recruitment at all. But that as a plot point rankled me a bit.

Overall Opinion:

It definitely is a book worth reading. Beautiful language, amazing chemistry and interesting weaving of the two cultures adds to the beauty of the story. A perfect read!

Four Stars

Thoughts after reading the book:

The subject of an Indian women falling in love in a foreign country with a white man has intrigued me quite a lot. This has nothing to do with the color and even the country, but more about the openness of the culture. I know there are many Indian women and girls who are forward and are open in dating, but till date there is a section of female population of the country who truly are quite subdued when it comes to the sexual desires or simply dating.

And when it comes to western culture, men are perceived as someone who are quite promiscuous (I know this is not true in every case, but still the perceptions are not always true).

It makes me wonder about the courage it will take for these women to shed their inhibitions and date such western men. Same way, it will take huge amount of understanding on the male’s part as well to fight with the preconceived notion of the women. And the signals– I think it will be so difficult for them to translate those signals as well for both males and females.

I have seen this problem occurring in case when both male and female are from the same country, but the female has lived in a reserved environment.

And when families are involved– it turns into a battle on both the fronts. The book did justice to this fact, but I was left wondering for a long time how difficult it is to shed the inhibitions and to trust someone. I probably won’t have that courage(but then I have not even fallen in love with such a person yet!) Probably that is why it is said that the love transcends boundary. Having that kind of affair and developing that kind of trust will be too difficult.

You can stalk the author @

               

Check out The Book Club Tour Schedule 


Join the Rafflecopter for wonderful prizes

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Breach- A Book Club Book Review

final banner

Breach Cover

 

Add it to GoodReads

Buy from Amazon

Buy from Flipkart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When this book was put for review, I was told that this is the book by the woman who leads Mills & Boons in India. Of course, since I live under the rock, I had never heard about the author Amrita Chaudhary. The only reason I picked up the book was I wanted to know was how a famous publisher writes and why was the whole Indian reading community knew about her except me (I already told the reason for this. I live under the rock! :P) And the book didn’t disappoint me. I planned to read one hour daily, but once I started reading, I was so engrossed in the book that I couldn’t keep it down. I finally rested my eyes  when I finally finished the book i.e. after five and a half hour of reading.

Book Summary

Breach is about the cyber security crime. It starts with Acel which is ready to file the patent for cancer-curing drug in the market. The data and all the details are taking place under the observant eye of Uday Veer in India. But everything goes haywire when some data gets corrupted and the whole Indian team is blamed for their ineptness. The book is about the search for the culprit through the maze of masked online identities. Introduced are a range of characters from teenagers to the local goons who are either the party to cyber crime or victim to cyber crime.

What I liked

1) The Intricacy of the Cyber Crime: That was the first thing that pulled me. I am an engineer but I am not tech savvy in the field of software or hardware or internet general. My knowledge is pretty basic when it comes to the online things. That’s why I enjoyed reading all the things that were shown. I am not sure how much of that can really happen (I do think that most of it can happen!) but it was interesting and a bit fearing to read about all the cyber crime thing.

2) Characters : I think this was the strongest part of the book for me. There were quite a number of characters in the story, but none of them was painted white or black. They were neither good, nor bad. I actually sympathized with all the villains and shook my head at some stupidity of the heroes.

3) Teenagers: The teenager characters of Raghu and Madhu deserve a special mention here. I absolutely adored their story. I don’t have any reasons for it, but these two were my favorite characters in the story.

What I Disliked

1) Small Errors: The book was quite well-edited but still I found some small errors in it. I would not have mentioned these anywhere else, but this is a publisher-written book. At least this book should have been error-free, although I wonder if there really are error-free books.

2) Too many characters in the beginning: There were just too many characters introduced in the story in the initial chapters. This made the beginning a bit slow, but the story finally caught the pace in the middle.

Overall Summary: It was an interesting book. I usually don’t enjoy thrillers too much, but this book was fun. A good read after a long time.

My Rating:

Four Stars

Meet the Author

Amrita Verma Chowdhury is the author of Faking It, an art crime thriller about fake modern and contemporary Indian art.
She holds engineering degrees from IIT Kanpur and UC Berkeley, where she was a Jane Lewis Fellow, and an MBA from Carnegie Mellon (Tepper Business School). Her work as an engineer in Silicon Valley led to seven US patents for semi-conductor fabrication – something to show for those bad-haired days. She has done Strategy Consulting and Board Effectiveness work in the US and Australia and has spent long nights fitting five-syllable words inside two-by-two squares. She has worked in the rarefied bastions of Ivy League education bringing together ideas and people. She currently works in publishing.
She lives in Mumbai with her husband Sumit, their two children Shoumik and Aishani, and an assortment of pets including a cocker spaniel, a guinea pig and two turtles. She loves travelling, baking cupcakes with her daughter and hearing from her readers.
 You can stalk her @

                  

 

This Tour is Hosted by 

 

 

The Ekkos Clan– Book Club Review

 
The Ekkos Clan 
by 
Sudipto Das
 

What attracted me towards this book was its root in time of Partition of India!

When India was partitioned, there was a lot of bloodshed, lot of scars. It was a very black period of communal and political riots. My grandparents were one of the survivors of those riots. They came from Pakistani Punjab hidden in the drums and tempos. I grew up hearing how partition affected their life, so I was aware about one part of it. But I never thought about Bangladesh-Calcutta partition. Bangladesh which suffered twice—once when it became East Pakistan and secondly when it became an independent country in itself. Twice the pain, twice the fights—getting borne is a messy project.

Moreover this books promised history of Aryans and Rig Veda, which I can’t get enough of.

The Blurb
“The Ekkos Clan” is the story of Kratu’s search for the killers of his family, his own roots and the mystery behind his grandmother’s stories.
It’s the fascinating account of Kubha and the basketful of folklore she inherited from her ancestors. The eventful lives of Kubha and her family span a hundred years and encompass turbulent phases of Indian history. The family saga unfurls gradually, along with Kubha’s stories, through the three main characters – Kratu Sen, a grad student at Stanford, Kratu’s best friend Tista Dasgupta, and Afsar Fareedi, a linguistic Afsar hears about Kubha’s stories from Kratu in a casual conversation, but she figures  that these stories are not meant to be mere bed time tales – they contain rich linguistic fossils and layers of histories.
In a bizarre incident Kratu miraculously survives an attempt on his life. His sister and uncle had not been so lucky. Were these murders acts of revenge, or a larger ideological conflict connected to Kubha’s stories which conceal perilous secrets that should be suppressed?

Afsar, Kratu and Tista travel across continents to unravel the mystery of Kubha’s roots and the origin of her stories.

At a different level, the novel subtly delves into the origin of one of the oldest civilizations of the world and the first book written by mankind.

 
Buy @
 

What I Liked:

  • Partition tales: The author did justice in explaining us the pain of partition. Through various characters, backflashes, and the elders’ stories—it carried that nostalgia of uprooting one’s home and settling in some unknown place for safety. It depicts the horrors committed during that time quite well.
  • Innovative take on history: I’ll say that although the portion of the story felt a bit incredible, they were able to capture my interest. I was amazed at the interpretation of Vedas and how the simple stories were depicted. I’ve myself wondered many times about how the stories in our vedas and granthas originated.

What I disliked:

  • Too many characters: There are quite a lot of characters in the story. I felt so lost in the initial chapters that I had to resort to making a tree of characters to keep track of them. And I’m talking about the first and second chapter in itself.
  • History Lessons: There were sections in the story which felt like a lesson of history textbook. I was so tempted to skip those sections.

Final Thoughts

The book might feel like “Da Vinci Code” because like Dan Brown’s different take on Christianity, this book focuses on Hinduism. But don’t set the bars too high and try reading the book with a clean slate and you will surely enjoy it. It’s quite different kind of story.

Meet the Author

 

Sudipto was born in Calcutta to a family which fled Bangladesh during the partition riots of 1947. He grew up listening horrid stories of the partition, something which he has used extensively in his debut novel The Ekkos Clan. He completed his engineering from IIT Kharagpur in 1996. He lives in Bangalore.
You can stalk him @


                  
           Wikipedia Media Mentions 


“A promising debut in the growing realm of modern Indian fiction” – Jug Suraiya 
“An Indian thriller inspired by Dan Brown & Harrison Ford!… fast-paced thriller, replete with murder and miraculous escapes” – Telegraph 
“If you are a history buff and a thriller aficionado, then [it] might just be the book for you” – The Hindu 
“A tale of the Indian civilization and culture… takes you on a roller coaster ride” – The New Indian Express 
“An interesting read for an afternoon… One feisty woman’s partition story” – Bangalore Mirror 
“Should be read for its sheer aspiration and the intelligent handling of historical material” – The Sunday Guardian 
“Is essentially a mystery novel, but is grounded in a substantial base of research and exploration into our past” – newsyaps.com

This Tour is Hosted by 

Against All Rules– A Book Club book review

Against All Rules
By 
Summerita Rhayne
There are times in life when after a tiring day one wants to sit back with  a cup of coffee in one hand and a book in other. At that time, I don’t want to delve in a different world or difficult character. I just want to enjoy the warmth of a simple romance with the hot coffee. That’s where I’ll place this book. It doesn’t have bells and whistles, but it’s a simple plain romance.
 The Blurb

 The efficient PA out of her depth… Samara knows getting attracted to Tahir is like asking for trouble. Not only is he her boss but he’s got divorced recently and has sworn off any commitment. Short term is not on her list but temptation has never been stronger. The man who doesn’t have faith in rainbows anymore… Tahir doesn’t believe in enforcing a code of conduct he cannot follow. But Samara might just make him make an exception! An affair at the office might seem a solution to his troubles but how can he avoid treading uncharted territory…? Against All Rules when fire is set, it’s hard to avoid the blaze

 
Buy @
 
What I liked
1) Romance: As I said above, it’s perfect for unwinding yourself. It’ll make you smile at some parts, make you feel frustrated at some parts. The romance is and attraction between both the characters is woven nicely.
2) Short length: It’s not a long story. I finished it in one sitting, but then my reading speed is quite fast. But I can promise you that it’s not more than four sitting book.
What I disliked
1) Absence of Plot: This might feel like contradicting myself, but it’s not so. See even a simple romance in my view should have a journey for its character. Here the story felt as if author missed the beginning and started the story from the middle. It captures the romance and growing attractions beautifully, but then it doesn’t elaborate on Samara’s growth as a character. She’s confused in the beginning and she’s confused till the end.
2) Repetition: There are many words and ideas which are repeated throughout the story. Even the name of the dessert “ras malai” is repeated twice and that made me laugh.
3) Unbelievable Reactions: The characters, after having unprotected sex, thinks about the baby first rather than STD. I mean I waited for either of them to raise this question, but they didn’t. They argued about marriage; they discussed the possibility of child, but medical reasons don’t even cross their minds.
Although I don’t think that is truly the fault of author. That is the fault of our culture. Here people check bank balance, education and caste before marriage (and sex too), but they never think about health or other disease.
Final Thoughts
I know my review is harsh, but the book was not that bad. In fact it was an average book for an average night after office. It’s just that I like to talk about every aspect of the book. So, in case you’re thinking of relaxing with tired mind, go for this book.
Meet the Author
Summerita Rhayne loves to write sensual and emotional romance. There’s no knowing when some quirky – or sometimes even not so quirky – happening in daily life might trigger her right brain and then she’s off craving a new story. She loves writing characters who learn and grow and find their way out of their troubles and emotional hang-ups. Hot, sensual heroes and sassy but sweet heroines mostly fit the bill in her stories. She also believes that a touch of humor never goes amiss in a book.She divides her time between family, job and writing – and loves winding down with music, movies and the internet!
You can stalk Summerita Rhyane @
                  

This Tour is Hosted by 

Previous Older Entries